Video gallery

 

This page is a collection of video resources and conference presentations  

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Keeping the Body in Mind

 

Keeping the Body In Mind (KBIM) is a District wide program of SESLHD Mental Health for consumers of the Service developed to prevent and address cardiometabolic health issues. There are teams based at Bondi, Maroubra, St George and Sutherland. Each team consists of a nurse, exercise physiologist, dietitian and peer support worker.

This series of videos form a series of online training and education resources.

Modules include:

  • Exercise

  • Nutrition

  • Smoking

  • Medical Management

  • How to Implement

Dont Just Screen, Intervene!

Positive Cardiometabolic Health: An Early Intervention Framework For Patients On Psychotropic Medication.

 

Presentation First Author: Jackie Curtis

 

Abstract: 

The relationship between weight gain and the treatment of first episode psychosis (FEP) with psychotropic medication has been well established, with obesity and metabolic syndrome common sequelae. Such metabolic abnormalities create further disease burden on a population already dealing with mental illness, whose life expectancy is approximately 20 years less than the general population, primarily due to cardiovascular complications. A clinical algorithm for mental health clinicians and primary care has been developed and utilised by an early intervention programme in Bondi, Sydney.The practical use of this algorithm will be described for youth FEP populations, including targeted lifestyle interventions, as well as specific pharmacological strategies. The plans for evaluation of the clinical algorithm will be highlighted.

 

 

Conference Name: IEPA 2012

Presentation Date: October, 2012

Additional Authors: Jackie Curtis, Hannah Newall, Katherine Samaras, David Shiers

Early Lifestyle Intervention Attenuates Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain In First Episode Psychosis

 

Presentation First Author: Jackie Curtis

 

Abstract: 

Youth with first episode psychosis (FEP) receiving antipsychotic (AP) medications are at risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Young people with FEP aged 15-25 were enrolled in the 'Keeping the Body in Mind Program, including weekly individualized dietetic monitoring and education and group education, and individualized exercise prescriptions by an exercise physiologist, utilising a supervised on-site gym. 

 

Conference Name: IEPA 2014

Presentation Date: November, 2014

Additional Authors: Andrew Watkins - Simon Rosenbaum - Scott Teasdale - Megan Kalucy - Katherine Samaras - Philip B. Ward

The Use Of Metformin In Preventing Obesity And Metabolic Syndrome In Early Psychosis

 

Presentation First Author: Philip B Ward

 

Abstract: 

The relationship between weight gain and the treatment of first episode psychosis (FEP) with psychotropic medication has been well established, with obesity and metabolic syndrome common sequelae. Such metabolic abnormalities create further disease burden on a population already dealing with mental illness, whose life expectancy is approximately 20 years less than the general population, primarily due to cardiovascular complications. Antipsychotic-induced weight gain has been shown to commence within the first months of initiating treatment in drug naïve youth, thus early intervention is necessary in order to prevent or slow the progression of metabolic abnormalities. 

 

Conference Name: IEPA 2012

Presentation Date: October, 2012

Additional Authors: Philip B Ward, Stephanie Roland, Li Xian Lim, Jackie Curtis, Katherine Samaras

What’s In The Physician’s Toolbox?
Medical Management Of Obesity, Diabetes Risk And Cardiovascular Risk Factors In Psychosis.

 

Presentation Authors: Katherine Samaras & David Shiers

 

Abstract: 

People with psychosis have a 20-year shortfall in life expectancy, attributable to cardiovascular disease. People with psychosis also have higher diabetes rates. Mental illness, social isolation and other sociodemographic factors often impair performance in often complex diabetes self-care, with poorer control and ensuing risks of diabetes complications (amputation, renal failure and heart disease). With training and support, medical practitioners from many different disciplines could be engaged in the cardiometabolic care of people with psychosis. Clinical guidelines (adopted and in development) will be discussed. Better physical health in people with psychosis can be achieved, with cohesive multidisciplinary care instigated early.

 

Conference Name: IEPA 2012

Presentation Date: October, 2012

Additional Authors: Katherine Samaras

Cardiometabolic Risk in First Episode Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorder Patients
Baseline Results from the Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode Early Treatment Program (RAISE-ETP) Study

 

Presentation First Author: Christoph U Correll

 

Abstract: 

Background: Schizophrenia individuals have high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality yet, risk status and moderators/mediators in the earliest illness stages are less clear. Methods: Baseline results of the NIMH-funded Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) study, collected at 34 sites in 21 US states from 07/2010-07/2012. Participants were patients aged 15-40 years with research-confirmed diagnoses of first-episode psychosis and...

 

Conference Name: IEPA 2014

Presentation Date: November, 2014

Emerging psychosis: approaches, tips, strategies for GPs and other mental health professionals

 

Dr David Shiers and Dr Jackie Curtis in conversation (February 2013)

[This podcast is a collaboration between The Mental Health Services Conference (TheMHS) and Mental Health Professionals Network (MHPN)]

'Keeping the Body in Mind' video

 

This video describes the Bondi "Keeping the Body in Mind" program to prevent weight gain and cardiometabolic complications in young people experiencing psychosis. Sponsored by Rethink UK-for the National Psychosis Summit, April 2014. From Workshop 2: Physical Health Support.  

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Email : info@iphys.org.au

 

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Get involved with the iphYs community through social media. There are ongoing developments in the algorithm and HeAL roll outs around the world. Keep up to date.

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HeAL 

 

A group of clinicians, service users, family members and researchers from eleven countries have joined forces to develop an international consensus statement on improving the physical health of young people with psychosis. The statement, called Healthy Active Lives (HeAL), aims to reverse the trend of people with severe mental illness dying early by tackling risks for future physical illnesses pro-actively and much earlier.

 

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